Tuesday, August 11, 2009

Video: "Sentinels of the Heliosphere"

I've written a number of posts on this blog dealing with Electric Universe (EU) advocates claims that the Sun and stars are powered externally by giant cosmic electric currents.

Electric Cosmos: The Solar Resistor Model
Electric Cosmos: The Solar Capacitor Model. I. II. III.

In these articles, I've often written about how our satellites around the Solar System see no evidence of the currents needed to power the Sun by this mechanism.

But just where are all those satellites?

Now the Scientific Visualization Studio at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center has produced a video tour of the NASA fleet of spacecraft patrolling the region around our Sun. Note that this production does not include all of the satellites. It is focused primarily on those operated by the NASA Heliophysics Division that have been operating over the past two years. It does not include Pioneer 10 or 11, nor the Ulysses mission which was recently shut down.



Link to narrated version on NASA Podcast link & SVS
Link to older unnarrated version

So with all these satellites out there, why can't they detect the alleged intense flux of Sunward-bound electrons needed to power the Electric Sun?

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Although you were careful to state the scope - only currently active spaceprobes which one division of NASA is directly involved with - the point you made in the close, about non-detection of the sorts of currents required by Scott's ideas, is confirmed by independent non-detections, from a wide variety of spaceprobes, both currently active and no longer returning data.

These include (no attempt to be comprehensive):

* Double Star (China)

* Venus Express (ESA)

* Cassini (joint NASA/ESA)

* Rosetta (ESA, though plasma instruments not returning data during the cruise phase)

* ACE (NASA)

* MESSENGER (NASA)

* New Horizons (NASA, though plasma instruments not returning data during the cruise phase)

* ICE

gpplascencia said...

Wow... just, wow! As a skeptic, I am often acused of not having a sense of 'wonder'. I always respond that it is not that I do not 'wonder', but since I understand how many things work, for me to 'wonder', I have to see really cool stuff, and man! This is SO COOL!